Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Mosquitoes are vectors for diseases, which means they can transmit diseases from one human or animal to another. The mosquito population is hard to control, and they often develop resistance to insecticides, making the containment and elimination of mosquito-borne diseases difficult. According to the American Mosquito Control Association, more than one million people worldwide die from mosquito-borne diseases every year.

The increase of global travel has brought diseases once uncommon or unheard of in the United States to our shores. Outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses such as the Zika Virus, Chikungunya, Dengue Fever and West Nile Virus have become more commonplace in recent years.

Check here often for the latest information and resources on mosquito-borne illnesses in Alabama.

Additional Information:

Mosquito Traps

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) is monitoring mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases throughout the state. Two types of adult mosquito traps are placed in various locations overnight. Both operate on portable batteries and use carbon dioxide or special chemical lure in a tube to enhance collections. The CDC trap is made of a plastic cylinder with a fan and a light that hangs under a plastic pan from a tree limb or other structure. The sentinel trap is a collapsible vinyl barrel with a plastic lid and fan which sits on the ground. For mosquito egg surveillance, six-inch black plastic cups with a drain hole in the side and lined with a special paper are set for about a week. See photos of the types of mosquito traps in use below.

What's New?

For an overview on Zika Virus, statistics, and resources, visit Zika Virus.

 

Cases Reported Year-To-Date*

Total of Cases by Year Reported 

Mosquito-Borne Disease

 

2018

 

2017

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

California serogroup viruses (California encephalitis, Jamestown Canyon, Keystone, La Crosse, Snowshoe hare, Trivittatus viruses)

0

0

0

0^

0^

0^

2

Chikungunya

0

0

1

1^

1^

19^

0

Dengue

0

0

0

5

3^

3

5

Eastern equine encephalitis

0

0

0

0^

0^

1^

0

Malaria

5

5

8

10

11

14^

2

St. Louis encephalitis

0

0

1

0^

0^

1^

1

West Nile Virus

4

4

59

18^

9^

2^

9

Yellow Fever

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Zika

3

3

4

41^

0^

0^

0

Total

12 12

73

75

24

40

18

Note: Counts include finalized investigations among Alabama residents as of August 9, 2018

*As of MMWR Week 31 (week ending August 3, 2018)

^The case definition was updated this year for this condition. 





Page last updated: August 9, 2018