What Is PrEP/PEP?

What is PrEP?

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high risk for HIV take HIV medicines daily to lower their chances of getting infected. PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading throughout your body. It is highly effective for preventing HIV if used as prescribed, but it is much less effective when not taken consistently.

Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods.

Source: CDC - HIV/AIDS - Prep and PrEP 101 (CDC)

Greater Than AIDS Videos

  

Alabama Agencies Providing PrEP

PrEP AdvertisementThe 1917 Clinic at UAB
Community Care Building
908 South 20th Street
Birmingham, AL 35294-2050
Phone: (205) 934-1917
Website: uab.edu/medicine/1917clinic
Email

Thrive Alabama
600 St. Clair Ave., Building 3
Huntsville, AL 35801
Phone: (256) 536-4700
Fax: (256) 536-4117
Website: thrivealabama.org

Medical Advocacy and Outreach
2900 McGehee Road
Montgomery, AL 36111
Phone: (334) 280-3349
Toll Free: (800) 510-4704
Website: maoi.org

Birmingham AIDS Outreach
205 32nd Street S
Birmingham, AL 35233
Phone: (205) 322-4197
Website: birminghamaidsoutreach.org

Five Horizons Health Services
2720 6th St.
Tuscaloosa, AL 35401
Phone: (205) 759-8470
Website: fivehorizons.org

Health Services Center
608 Martin Luther King Drive
Anniston, AL 36201
Phone: (256) 832-0100
Website: hscal.org

Infirmary Urgent Care
Thomasina Sharpe, M.D.
108-C McMeans Ave.
Bay Minette, AL 36507
Phone: (251) 937-7100

Jefferson County Department of Health
1400 6th Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35233
Phone: (205) 930-1175
Website: jcdh.org

Physicians Resources

General Public Resources

Other Resources

What is PEP?

PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) means taking antiretroviral medicines (ART) after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected.

PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a recent possible exposure to HIV. If you think you've recently been exposed to HIV during sex or through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs, or if you've been sexually assaulted, talk to your health care provider or an emergency room doctor about PEP right away.

Source: CDC-HIV/AIDS-PEP and PEP 101 (CDC)

Clinical Resources





Page last updated: April 6, 2018